Scleral Buckles

Often times patients may experience retinal detachments, which, if caught early enough, can be treated. To treat certain types of retinal detachments, Dr. Khetpal may choose to use a scleral buckle. A piece of silicone sponge or semi-hard plastic is placed around the outside of the eye and sewn into place. Usually this device is left in place permanently.
The device works like a belt that pushes in, or buckles the sclera (the white part of the eye) towards the middle of the eye. When the sclera is pushed inwards the traction effecting the retina is relieved thereby allowing the retina to settle against the wall of the eye. Sometimes the device only covers the area behind the tear, and other times the device is placed around the eye like a ring.
Typically the buckle itself does not prevent a retinal break from opening again. In addition to the scleral buckle the eye surgeon will typically use laser photocoagulation to spot weld the retina back onto the eye wall till a seal between the retina and the eye wall forms.

Last Updated: September 09, 2014 This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information. © 1995-2015 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated

Last Updated: September 09, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
© 1995-2015 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated

The Surgery and Risks

The scleral buckle surgeries performed through the Texoma Retina Center are done in an operating room on an out-patient basis, meaning the patient will go home the same day. The surgery usually takes 1 to 2 hours but the time may vary depending on the complexity of the detachment.
Patients may experience pain for a few days after the surgery and may have swelling, redness, or tenderness for several weeks.While scleral buckles are effective, as with any medical procedure, it is important to consider the risks. The risks for the surgery include infection, a raised pressure inside the eye (patients with glaucoma may have an increased risk for this), bleeding in the eye, detachment of the choroid layer, refractive error, and in some cases the device may impinge on the eye muscles. While there are other risks, Dr. Khetpal will provide you with any necessary information. If you have any questions please ask during your visits.

For more information regarding scleral buckles, the uses, and the risks, please visit the WebMD article on Scleral Buckles